blackfashion:

The African American male is faced with a society that labels him before he is able to identify his own place within the diaspora. The common view is that Black America exists only in relation to White America; Black men exist only in relation to their white counterparts. This view, along with a “post-racial” multi-media brainwashing, leaves the Black man with little space to define himself. The Black man’s ever-evolving self-identification in America has been his longest battle. Slaves had to imagine themselves as Men in a world where they were told they were animals. Black men had to imagine themselves as citizens in a society that told them they didn’t deserve the same rights. Now we must imagine ourselves as Kings in the face of new Klans and as divine decedents of Gods in a mind of our own, that has been told that our physical reality is the only one that exists. 

Photographed and written by Jordan Shanks 

blackfashion:

The African American male is faced with a society that labels him before he is able to identify his own place within the diaspora. The common view is that Black America exists only in relation to White America; Black men exist only in relation to their white counterparts. This view, along with a “post-racial” multi-media brainwashing, leaves the Black man with little space to define himself. The Black man’s ever-evolving self-identification in America has been his longest battle. Slaves had to imagine themselves as Men in a world where they were told they were animals. Black men had to imagine themselves as citizens in a society that told them they didn’t deserve the same rights. Now we must imagine ourselves as Kings in the face of new Klans and as divine decedents of Gods in a mind of our own, that has been told that our physical reality is the only one that exists. 

Photographed and written by Jordan Shanks 

Reblogged from: blackfashion
Reblogged from: sometimesk
Source: luxx-life
keepasecretslut:

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Reblogged from: sometimesk
Source: wheedyedhair
Reblogged from: fuckyeahrihanna
bruceaford:

de-la-heem:

i don’t wanna live like this

Lmao. Truth.

bruceaford:

de-la-heem:

i don’t wanna live like this

Lmao. Truth.

Reblogged from: bruceaford

thechanelmuse:

1,000 roses on Canfield, The area where Mike Brown was murdered.

Reblogged from: hellocupcakes88
Reblogged from: hellocupcakes88

unapologetakallyme:

theblackpicassa:

midniwithmaddy:

Buzzfeed: “17 Black Women Who Deserve their own Biopics”

Not enough roles for black women in Hollywood? Let’s make some!

1. Thandie Newton/Alice Walker, 2. Amber Riley/Aretha Franklin, 3. Kerry Washington/Vonetta McGee, 4. Lupita Nyong’o/Grace Jones, 5. Mo’Nique/Hattie McDaniel, 6. Oprah Winfrey/Mary McLeod Bethune, 7. Regina Hall/Moms Mabley, 8. Teyonah Parris/Assata Shakur, 9. Viola Davis/Shirley Chisholm, 10. Jurnee Smollett/Eartha Kitt

I cosign.

YES YES YES YES!!!!
*insert Drake stomping gif*

Reblogged from: hellocupcakes88

bornabitch-allthedaysandnights:

trungles:

theblacksophisticate:

feminism5ever:

When people say “culture is meant to be shared” I’m literally like ???? Because that has literally never been the purpose of any culture. Culture is about identity, community and family. It’s about tradition. It is not and has never been about “sharing”.

Say it!

They keep saying “shared” when they mean “made available for my consumption.”

and boom goes the dynamite

Reblogged from: hellocupcakes88
Reblogged from: hellocupcakes88